April 12, 2014

ofdarklands:

I am very serious about everything and I am holding puppies

(Source: gameofgifs, via symbolicsodomy)

April 12, 2014

starkspangledjohnlock:

blackkolors:

#Tony isn’t the all-American good guy kid of superhero #It’s not that he doesn’t know how to be selfless or put the cause above himself #It’s that he doesn’t know how to show that he doesn’t FEEL like the all-American good guy #So he hides behind different masks #One as Iron Man #And one as Tony Stark #genius billionaire playboy philanthropist #who jokes about the most important things #and acts like he has everything under control #because he needs to #because he’s afraid if people look close enough they’ll see how he really feels #how he isn’t ‘good’ enough #and he doesn’t feel like he’s worth it #so when push comes to shove #he’ll take the course of action that will take himself out of the equation #or make people hate him #so everyone else makes it out okay #because he may not be worth it #but if he can save as many people as possible #then THAT is worth it to him

(via majorsarcasm19)

4:48am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZQjLyx1CpCNyk
  
Filed under: iron man 
April 12, 2014

We Can’t Get Out Of The Bedroom Now.

Shirley Maclaine on Parkinson in 1975

(Source: biscuitsarenice, via ashipwithoutaname)

April 11, 2014

A scratch! But ask for me tomorrow and you shall find me a grave man.

(Source: team-caroline, via regala-electra)

April 11, 2014

penryyn:

how the hell do you cancel a show like this

(Source: ailesdefee, via ashipwithoutaname)

7:12pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZQjLyx1Cmw4NY
  
Filed under: firefly 
April 6, 2014

jeanpaulfarte:

in stories featuring aliens, they’re always like “on my planet this never happens!” or “in my culture, this differs from your human culture.” and that’s neat and all because i like worldbuilding and all that jazz but wouldn’t it be fun if they just. couldn’t do that?

i want a story where humans encounter an alien who frustrates them because they don’t know enough to tell them anything concrete

like humans will ask “tell us about politics in your planet!” and the alien’s all “uh… hold on it’s been a while since i took gov. um….”

"what sorts of plants grow on your planet?"

"i dunno i grew up in the suburbs. they’re like… purple? idk what you want me to say"

"tell us about the culture on your planet!"

"do you have any idea how many fucking countries are back home, i don’t even know where to begin"

"your planet is obviously much more scientifically and technologically advanced than ours. is it possible for you to enlighten us on certain matters concerning space travel, or would that be a form of interference you must avoid?"

"naw it’s cool, it’s just that, um, i’m a philosophy major"

(via professorwolfjwolf)

April 6, 2014

julialost:

AU where you’re a normal human until you hit puberty and you start turning into a monster.

Literally a monster. Like a harpie, a werewolf, a semi-snake (sorry forgot the name) or even a mermaid, a centaur, a vampire, a fawn, ect …

Like you get this very awkard phase between human and monster where you have only certain parts covered in fur or feathers and growing your werewolf teeth hurt like hell and learning to walk in all fours now. Growing mermaids suffocating in class cause they’re starting to need their water, growing vampires starting to take the night classes and wear sunglasses and umbrellas and gloves and hats on daytime. You think you’re the most awfull thing on Earth until you finally reach the end and everybody’s a fab monster. All the awkwardess of puberty. But with monsters.

oh man I need to draw this.

(via stardust-rain)

April 6, 2014
5 examples of how the languages we speak can affect the way we think.

fromonesurvivortoanother:

divineirony:

To say, “This is my uncle,” in Chinese, you have no choice but to encode more information about said uncle. The language requires that you denote the side the uncle is on, whether he’s related by marriage or birth and, if it’s your father’s brother, whether he’s older or younger.

“All of this information is obligatory. Chinese doesn’t let me ignore it,” says Chen. “In fact, if I want to speak correctly, Chinese forces me to constantly think about it.”

This got Chen wondering: Is there a connection between language and how we think and behave? In particular, Chen wanted to know: does our language affect our economic decisions?

Chen designed a study — which he describes in detail in this blog post — to look at how language might affect individual’s ability to save for the future. According to his results, it does — big time.

While “futured languages,” like English, distinguish between the past, present and future, “futureless languages,” like Chinese, use the same phrasing to describe the events of yesterday, today and tomorrow. Using vast inventories of data and meticulous analysis, Chen found that huge economic differences accompany this linguistic discrepancy. Futureless language speakers are 30 percent more likely to report having saved in any given year than futured language speakers. (This amounts to 25 percent more savings by retirement, if income is held constant.) Chen’s explanation: When we speak about the future as more distinct from the present, it feels more distant — and we’re less motivated to save money now in favor of monetary comfort years down the line.

But that’s only the beginning. There’s a wide field of research on the link between language and both psychology and behavior. Here, a few fascinating examples:

Navigation and Pormpuraawans
In Pormpuraaw, an Australian Aboriginal community, you wouldn’t refer to an object as on your “left” or “right,” but rather as “northeast” or “southwest,” writes Stanford psychology professor Lera Boroditsky (and an expert in linguistic-cultural connections) in the Wall Street Journal. About a third of the world’s languages discuss space in these kinds of absolute terms rather than the relative ones we use in English, according to Boroditsky. “As a result of this constant linguistic training,” she writes, “speakers of such languages are remarkably good at staying oriented and keeping track of where they are, even in unfamiliar landscapes.” On a research trip to Australia, Boroditsky and her colleague found that Pormpuraawans, who speak Kuuk Thaayorre, not only knew instinctively in which direction they were facing, but also always arranged pictures in a temporal progression from east to west.

Blame and English Speakers
In the same article, Boroditsky notes that in English, we’ll often say that someone broke a vase even if it was an accident, but Spanish and Japanese speakers tend to say that the vase broke itself. Boroditsky describes a study by her student Caitlin Fausey in which English speakers were much more likely to remember who accidentally popped balloons, broke eggs, or spilled drinks in a video than Spanish or Japanese speakers. (Guilt alert!) Not only that, but there’s a correlation between a focus on agents in English and our criminal-justice bent toward punishing transgressors rather than restituting victims, Boroditsky argues.

Color among Zuñi and Russian Speakers
Our ability to distinguish between colors follows the terms in which we describe them, as Chen notes in the academic paper in which he presents his research (forthcoming in the American Economic Review; PDF here). A 1954 study found that Zuñi speakers, who don’t differentiate between orange and yellow, have trouble telling them apart. Russian speakers, on the other hand, have separate words for light blue (goluboy) and dark blue (siniy). According to a 2007 study, they’re better than English speakers at picking out blues close to the goluboy/siniy threshold.

Gender in Finnish and Hebrew
In Hebrew, gender markers are all over the place, whereas Finnish doesn’t mark gender at all, Boroditsky writes in Scientific American (PDF). A study done in the 1980s found that, yup, thought follows suit: kids who spoke Hebrew knew their own genders a year earlier than those who grew up speaking Finnish. (Speakers of English, in which gender referents fall in the middle, were in between on that timeline, too.)

This doesn’t surprise me. I’d also propose that since Chinese has no plural nouns, only context, that a greater sense of belonging to a group or community is present among native Chinese speakers, while English speakers feel more individualistic.

So I feel like everyone should immediately go read Ted Chiang’s amazing SF short story "The Story of Your Life," which is about learning an alien language that has an emphasis on knowing how the sentence about to spoken will end — which leads to an overall advanced understanding of time itself.

It’s a fantastic story. It’ll massively fuck with your mind. Read it.

(via stardust-rain)

April 6, 2014

helshades:

annabolina:

#you know thor is gonna go throw his room all ‘I USED TO HAVE ONE!’ just so he can give it to jane so she can take apart    #maybe he can’t find out and asks volstagg for one bc his kids have 300    #but also!!! THAT SOMETHING AS SIMPLE AS AN ASGARDIAN BALL IS SO ADVANCED    #and jane finds such wonder in it    #and even when she realised that it’s ball it doesn’t take away from it    #and thor doesn’t mock her for it    #he thinks it’s cute    #he’s definitely gonna find that ball    #he’s sure he had one    #maybe he broke it

Yeah, I can’t resist to reblog just to remind everybody that Thor fell for Jane Foster in the first place because she was so damn clever, and curious, and passionate about her work, and obstinate, and he was impressed and amazed and so touched to see the humans more resourceful than he thought and hey, here is another bit of Thor’s personality, he’s just so happy to have been proven wrong now that it allows him to see the best in people—

I just fail to understand why so many would dislike Jane Foster, and even more erase her character from their works; she is absolutely marvellous, both unbelievable and terribly realistic, adorable and awkward, driven but sweet, kind but relentless, and so fucking gifted. And there are people wondering why Thor is interested in her?! Argh!

Also this scene is quite wonderful: you have two people who had a crush on each other last time they met, but who have been unable to see each other since, and the current events are hardly allowing them to get to know each other better—and they kinda find themselves in the same situation they were last time, and you see how they reconnect and it’s just perfect. Perfectly untimely and a little bit tragic, too.

(Source: thor-cat, via into-the-weeds)

2:24am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZQjLyx1CF6gtb
  
Filed under: thor 2 
April 5, 2014

deviatesinc:

Mary McCarty fools around while recording the cast album for Miss Liberty, 1949

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